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How to Motivate your Kids to do their Chores

Updated On — 28th Jun, 2020

Do you feel like you are constantly nagging your kids to do their chores? Motivating your child to do their chores can be tricky. But with the right strategy getting your child to do their chores can be easier.

Chores are an essential part of raising your kids. Follow these tips to take the guess work out of getting your kids to do their house work.

Chores Can Help your Child Learn about Teamwork

Chores can help develop a sense of responsibility and self worth in your child. It should be understood by all family members they are expected and necessary to a household running successfully and efficiently.

They can help create a sense of unity and family and is a great place for your child to learn about teamwork.

Parents should take special care to handle the delegation of chores to children so they don’t become a source of frustration or create arguments.

Allow your child to have an active say in the delegation of chores.

1 Give them choices

We all have household chores that we don’t like to do, but if it’s a chore the child enjoys doing then there’s less likelihood it will create a battle in the end.

The child will most likely appreciate having the chance to be heard and having a choice. It’s imperative that you set parameters early on for the successful completion of a chore.

They may not perform up to snuff when they first start performing the chore, but show them where improvement is needed and praise them for a strong effort.

Also make sure the child understands there will be repercussions if they only put forth a minimal effort.

2 Help them Understand

Ensure the child understands the need for the chore’s effective and efficient completion.

Set consequences for substandard completion as a team. Make sure they see that if they don’t perform their chores, it affects the other members of the team.

Spouses must work together and be a strong example for their children by completing their own chores each day. And don’t allow a child to undermine your authority by battling with you over a designated chore.

Stand your ground and don’t give in, and emphasize the consequence and negative effect an uncompleted chore has on the family.

3 Allow Feedback

And keep an open mind when a child wants to discuss their thoughts or express their opinions about chores.

Make sure the conversation stays positive and on target.

4 Praise your Child’s Accomplishments with a Chore Chart

It can be very frustrating to ask your child over and over again to complete their chores without them ever getting done.

If this describes your house to a tee, consider designing a chore chart.

Chores might include taking out the garbage, doing the dishes, cleaning their room, yard work or putting laundry in the laundry room. Each chore has to be done just once or twice a week.

Anything more is unrealistic.

After your child completes each chore, they can put a check mark on the chore chart.

At the end of each week, it’s very inspiring for both parent and child to look at the chore chart and easily see that each designated job was completed.

Just like our ‘to do’ lists, your child will find great satisfaction in being able to check off each chore as it’s completed and take pride knowing they accomplished a set task or list of tasks.

5 Discuss it with them

Once you’ve sat down with your child and discussed and designed a chore chart, it’s time to discuss the rewards for accomplishing each task listed.

Perhaps at your home you decide you will give a set sum for each task accomplished.

If you should decide to grant your child some sort of monetary allowance, make sure it’s age appropriate and granted on a regular basis.

A good rule of thumb is 50 cents per year of age. So your 8 year old child would earn $4.00 per week if each chore on the list has been completed.

If it has not been, they do not receive their allowance.

This is a great opportunity for you to teach your children the value of both earning and saving money, and also giving back.

6 Teach Them Money Management

Maybe your child can divide their allowance into thirds: 1/3 to spend, 1/3 to save, and 1/3 to use to help those less fortunate than themselves.

You might also want to consider designing a ‘bank book’ for each portion of the allowance and tuck each into three separate coffee cans or money jars, and that way you and your child will be able to keep track of how much has been saved, how much has been spent, and how much of their allowance has gone to help someone else.

Other forms of “currency”

Should you decide to use non-monetary incentives as chores payment, be sure you set clear parameters for your child.

Be sure they understand that two hours each weekend of their favorite video game or going to see a movie with mom or dad is only earned by completing the chore list successfully each week.

Consider writing these on a slip of paper as ‘currency’ for the child to keep in their ‘privilege bank’ and they can cash it in with you when they’d like.

Regardless of the method you choose, keep in mind this can be a valuable tool for both you and your child.   

7 Add Chores to their Regular Routine

Regular schedules provide the day with a structure that orders a young child’s world.

Although predictability can be tiresome for adults, children thrive on repetition and routine.

Schedules begin from the first days of life. Babies, especially, need regular sleep and meal programs and even routines leading up to those activities.

Dinnertime is a great place to start setting a routine. Sitting together at the dinner table gives children the opportunity to share their day and talk about their feelings.

This is also a great time to include some responsibility in your child’s routine, such as helping to set or clear the table.

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